Relative Supersaturation of Urine and Likelihood of Kidney Stones

11.12.2017

The likelihood of being a stone former increases with higher calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate relative supersaturation levels 

The urinary stones are mostly composed of calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, and uric acid. Usually, these salts can be found in the urine at various concentrations. As these densities increase, the urines become supersaturated. Depending on the level of this over-saturation, the risk to stone forming by combining precipitating the salt might happen.

One of the primary targets in the urinary stone prevention is to define the relative supersaturations of calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, and uric acid are used clinically in kidney stone prevention.

However, the magnitudes of association between levels of relative supersaturation and stone risk require further quantification.

In a study presented in the last days at the Kidney Week 2017 by a group from the United States and Italy, Authors compared collections from 2,505 stone formers and 1,267 controls to quantify the association between level of calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, and uric acid relative supersaturations and the likelihood of being a stone former.

The likelihood of being a stone former increases with higher calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate relative supersaturation levels in men and women, and higher relative supersaturation levels of uric acid in women. This increase begins at levels below the currently accepted 'normal' values.

Reference

Prochaska M, Taylor EN, Ferraro PM, et al. Relative supersaturation of 24-hour urine and likelihood of kidney stones. Data presented in poster format at Kidney Week 2017 in New Orleans (Oct. 31-Nov. 5). Abstract TH-PO1076.

Send me a message if you have any question or make an appointment (toll-free: 800444444 or +971 4 520 0500)

Emirates Hospital, Jumeirah Beach Road, opposite Jumeirah Park (below the Dubai Canal Bridge Take the U-turn under the bridge to reach the entrance) - Dubai